Juan and Alica Ruelas

PS-Opp_Pho_Ruelas_-J_A_1013938_v3-copy-625

Executive Diamond

California

Teachers Know Best – Juan and Alicia Ruelas were both high school teachers when they were first introduced to the AMWAY™ business opportunity, and it was Alicia who immediately saw the potential. “I wanted to be able to be home with our child – at the time we had only one – and somehow I knew in my heart this business might help me reach that goal,” she recalls.

Finally, one night after trying until the wee hours of the morning to convince Juan to come to a meeting, Alicia succeeded and Juan agreed. “I just wanted to get some sleep!” he kids.

After attending several meetings, and getting to know other couples and seeing their excitement, he decided perhaps Alicia was right. “Our lives were so busy back then with jobs and extracurricular activities, we were always going in different directions and we didn’t see each other much,” he says, noting that they taught at different schools. “In fact, we were starting to be more like strangers. So I thought working together would be good for our relationship.”

Once they committed to building their business, they went after it big time. First of all, they wanted to make sure the products were high quality. So they bought everything they possibly could and tried out each one, from SA8™ laundry detergent to NUTRILITE® supplements, before they began sharing them with others.

Not quite ready
1_823d97e7cd3b88024aefb12e0080d705_1386x924_cropBut getting others to see the benefits of the business proved harder than they thought. “I contacted lots of people, but no one wanted to pursue it,” recalls Juan, admitting that his enthusiasm caused him to start prospecting before he was really ready. “I thought the whole concept was so good that I just wanted to get out there and sponsor people before anybody else did,” he laughs.

He showed the Business Plan for four months before anybody said yes, and that was his brother, who really did it just to help him out. “And then three weeks later, he quit!” says Juan. “So I began to have many doubts when I first started out.”

Once again, Alicia stepped in to help. “I told him, ‘You need training before you can sponsor people. There are strategies to follow and there are people who can help you learn the right way to do it.’”

The right way
Juan says listening to tapes their upline gave them helped him get much better at presentations. “That really fired me up to get out there and get going again,” he recalls, adding that the positive reactions he got this time around helped build his confidence.

In the meantime, Alicia drew upon her teaching experience to train other women in their downline about how to use and sell the products. They also set daily goals and made sure they completed them. Throughout the process, they learned to work together as a team. And they kept their dreams in front of them to remind them why they were doing what they were doing.

1_d158ea088b60d568e45869d91f5fb7bd_1386x924_crop“My biggest motivator was that I wanted to help my grandmother, who raised me in Mexico, buy a house,” says Juan.

“I realized if we both fought for what we wanted, we could each achieve our goals,” adds Alicia. “So I treated this business as professionally as I did teaching, and I am very passionate about teaching.”

The more they practiced, the better they got at it. Both developed excellent leadership skills. And they soon realized that as they succeeded at building their organization, others, too, succeeded. “That is one of the best things about this business,” says Juan. “But you must be generous with your time and you must have a big heart to help others gain confidence and overcome their own fears. Everyone needs someone to believe in them and help them find their true potential.”

Succeeding at this business is a combination of learning, practicing, and leading by example.
Juan Ruelas

Stick to the basics
They believe in sticking to the basics when training their downlines: Use the products, show the Business Plan. “We also feel it’s important to teach new IBOs to be ‘doers,’” says Alicia. “In other words, don’t wait for things to happen. Take action, be in control.”

In fact, Juan thinks one of the biggest obstacles to success is just plain old laziness. “It’s so easy to be lazy and make excuses. There are so many distractions. But the way I look at it, we all have 24 hours in a day. You can either waste time or invest it. If you waste it you get nothing in return; whereas if you invest it, you always get something back. Anything worthwhile takes effort. Even if you collect bottles on the side of the road, you get a reward for your efforts.”

1_80d9f1dfa313d421bb59f461613d122d_1386x924_cropAlicia’s experience has taught her that many beginners also need to work on developing their interpersonal skills to help them build relationships with others. “You can learn all the facts, and that is very necessary, of course. But this is a people-oriented business, and people don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care,” she states.

They also believe in practicing what they preach and leading by example. They draw on the Amway Founders’ Fundamentals of Freedom, Family, Hope, and Reward as guideposts, and act with integrity in all they do.

As their organization grew larger and larger and their income steadily rose, eventually they left their teaching positions behind. And Juan happily reports that he did indeed help his grandmother buy her home – a dream come true for him.

Knowing what you want
“We never really had dreams until we came to this country,” he says. “Where I come from, the only thing people talk about is needs – I need this or I need that. It’s so important in life to know where you want to go and what you want to achieve.”

“I think it’s that way for people in any profession,” says Alicia. “Whether you’re a doctor or a lawyer or a professor, it’s not the title or the money you earn that’s important, it’s what you do with it that counts. Maybe it’s your parents or someone at your church or in your business –there are always people you can help with dreams of their own that need fulfilling.”

After so many years spent in the classroom, they really enjoy spending time with their boys now. One of the biggest adventures they took was in 2010 when the entire family went to the World Cup soccer matches in South Africa. “We could never have done anything like that if we had remained teachers,” says Juan.

Now when they look at their future, one of the things that excites them the most is thinking about the potential their business offers their sons. “They’ve already told us they want to get into the business!” says Alicia proudly.

“This nation was founded on the principles of free enterprise, the idea that if you work hard, you can accomplish something, and we all have the freedom to do that,” says Juan. “I believe this business is the true model of that great concept. And it’s available to anyone who wants it in this beautiful country.”

 


The average monthly Gross Income for “active” IBOs was $202.

Approximately 46% of all IBOs were active.

U.S. IBOs were considered “active” in months in 2010 when they attempted to make a retail sale, or presented the Amway IBO Compensation Plan, or received bonus money, or attended an Amway or IBO meeting. “Gross Income” means the amount received from retail sales, minus the cost of goods sold, plus monthly bonuses and cash incentives. It excludes all annual bonuses and cash incentives, and all non-cash awards. There may be significant business expenses, mostly discretionary, that may be greater in relation to income in the first years of operation.

Diamond Income Disclosure

Diamond Income Disclosure

2 Comments

  • juvenal

    son unas tremendas personas los admiramos mucho mi esposa se identifica con la cham tambien queremos ser diamantes para viajar a su lado para aprender de los mejores maestros y yo se qe ban para corona

  • CAROL

    Mi mama me a hablado mucho de ustedes.. son muy especiales para ella y para mi. ya que son un buen ejemplo para comensar el negocio. la verdad que estoy bien facinada. cuidense y que dios los bendiga.

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